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ABlackswell



Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Posts: 9
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 12:00 pm    Post subject: New member Reply with quote

Hello,

I'm new to this forum and my nearly 9 month old dog, Nelson, is my first dalmatian.

I have loved dalmatians since I was a little girl but had never been in the right life/work/home situation to be able to offer a dog a good home until last year. Raising a puppy has certainly been an experience! No amount of reading or preparation can prepare you for how challenging it can be! That said we're making good progress and my husband Will and I love Nelson to bits and can't imagine not having him in our lives.

I've only just joined the forum but I have found it incredibly useful as a reference tool in the past few months so thank you everybody. The main problems we're having at the moment is Nelson's fear of the car (excessive drooling, vomiting and generally not wanting to get in it), jumping up at people on walks, and his love of babies and children (a good thing but a bit too over enthusiastic!). Any advice on how to tackle those will be gratefully received.

We're going away at the end of this month for our first holiday since Nelson's arrival and the person we had lined up to dog sit now may not be able to because Nelson hasn't been neutered. We're based in Hampshire - can anybody recommend any good boarding kennels or dog sitters that would be able to cope with a very vocal, spotty boy who pulls on the lead, has hit and miss recall if he's seen something more interesting, eats a lot of things he shouldn't and steals food?! I'll also post about this in the general section...

Abby
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Spotalot



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 3185
Location: Essex

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello and welcome to you and Nelson.

In my experience with Daisy the car sickness is a hard one to deal with.
She was sick as a tiny pup when we collected her from her breeder and that experience stayed with her.

We tried all the advice, feeding her meals in a stationary car, playing In stationary car.
Treats to get her in. Daily car rides. Nothing worked for her.
She used to drool streams untill well over a year old.
I would say the only thing that helped a tiny bit was leaving the windows open a crack. Something to do with the cabin pressure.
She sort of just grew out of it really, although she is still reluctant to get in sometimes.
She no longer drools or is sick.
I never feed her even now if she is going on a long journey, just wait till the other end.

Jumping up at people is just ongoing training I'm afraid. Use o
A firm "off" comand followed by a swift "sit"and treat.
Unfortunately kind people don't help as they enthuse when meeting our breed and then up they go.
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Carol and Daisy X
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ABlackswell



Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Posts: 9
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you.

We had a very long drive home when we first collected Nelson from his breeder. We put him in a crate and he was sick and drooled a lot on that journey and has hated the car ever since. We've since been told that if we'd wrapped him in a towel and had him on my lap for that first journey he might have been happier but we were trying to do the right thing in terms of safety.

We've found that he's a lot better with another dog in the car. He's more likely to want to get in if our neighbours' lab leads the way. We try to take him on a daily trip to nearby woods with his lab friend so that the car journey is always followed by something fun and he's rarely sick on that journey now although he still drools and whines. Whenever we try to drive further afield or if he's on his own he drools a lot and tends to vomit after about 15 mins even if he was fed in the morning and we're driving late afternoon.

I'm really hoping he will grow out of it.

We'll keep perservering with the jumping up problem. I can see how the behaviour has been reinforced by other people since he was a small pup, as people do get very excited about dalmatians and want to say hello. What's cute when they're a tiny pup can be a bit more intimidating when they're 25kg though! And when strangers mistake his excited smile for a snarl that just adds to it!
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Spotalot



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 3185
Location: Essex

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't worry I've tried both methods of transporting puppies home and would def go for the safest.
Having a wriggly squealing sicky puppy on your lap is no fun either.

I even had a one to one with a trainer with daisy to try and cure the car sickness, but that didn't work either.

With the jumping up you could set it up with friends who are willing.
Get them to walk towards and if Nelson goes to jump up ask them to bring there knee up quickly and say OFF. Not touch the dog with the knee but just as a diversion. Then again ask him to sit and pat and feed him whilst sitting only and ignore when not.
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Maggi



Joined: 15 Apr 2004
Posts: 3161
Location: Derbyshire

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello and welcome. I've found that car sickness can be cured by making the car pleasant but unexciting - however it does take a bit of time. One of the easiest ways is to put dog in the car, drive round the block, come home take dog out and carry on. No walk or play at the end so dog does not associate car with exciting - but you can take dog for a walk half an hour later so he doesn't think car and walk necessarily assocoated. Gradually lengthen the trip and then sometimes stop for a little walk,but the whole thing needs to be short, pleasant and calm. If the dog is really ill, then at first just put him in the car. Sit in it for 10 minutes and then take him back out and indoors. The aim is for him to be in car and neither excited or sick. Once he can do the short trips successfully then you can do a little more. Ideally once or twice a day so car becomes routine. Itcan be a fairly longwinded process but usually works after a few sessions.
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Chris W



Joined: 29 Dec 2012
Posts: 140
Location: Western ,Canada

PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the forum. Here are a couple of easy hints to try that may help with car sickness. Place newspaper between the dog and the vehicle. Can be put under a blanket or towel but must seperate the the dog from touching the vehicle . I`m thinking that it probably prevents static electricity from reaching the dog?Feed a few ginger snaps (made with real ginger)before you start . You would have to figure out how many it would take to prevent the nausea. Feed a tiny bit of sweet sugary candy before the trip such as a jelly bean.
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Tim Lockett



Joined: 03 Jul 2012
Posts: 443
Location: Pensax, Worcestershire

PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello and welcome Abby and Nelson, I must say I have the opposite, if the car is open our three are in it Laughing Laughing I am a bad owner and have the windows down, but only at slow speeds. If one of us goes out in the land rover, they rush around the house saying "Our car is being stolen" On the very rare non rainy day I leave the back door open and they all sleep in it.

We had Wilf as a pup and he was sick on the journey home from Thorney Island to Portsmouth (Southsea) But he also grew to love it, so I'm afraid I can't offer any constructive advice, other than perhaps take Nelson with a group like ours to reassure him that travel in one of these noisy beasts is safe and fun. Smile

Though Dimmers isn't keen on those wimin drivers, Though Katie would have it "I'm an excellent driver"

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ABlackswell



Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Posts: 9
Location: Hampshire

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 4:52 pm    Post subject: Progress. Reply with quote

It's taken months but we've finally managed to make progress with the car sickness/drooling problem.

We got a new car which is quite extreme but it has helped tremendously. Nelson doesn't have to jump over the lip and down into the boot with the new car as the boot is level with the bumper and he seems much happier about that. We also continued car trips with our neighbours' lab and they gave us her blanket out of their car to line our boot with which seems to help put Nelson at ease.

The repetition has paid off and now that he has much better visibility out of the window he seems a lot happier. He still lip smacks occasionally but it doesn't progress to drooling or at least it hasn't for some time. We even managed to do a two hour round trip in a transit van with him sitting between my husband and I and there wasn't a drop of drool. I can't tell you how much of a relief it is to know that we can move forward.

He has started 'singing' quite loudly when we're driving to his favourite walk in the woods though but I'll happily take that over the copious amounts of drool and vomit that we had before!

The jumping up is still a work in progress. He'll be fine with most people and then when you're least expect it he'll jump up at somebody. And he's started humping male neutered dogs and not responding to recall which he was good at before. Twice in the last week I've had people telling me off because he wouldn't leave their dogs alone. He's a year old on 17th June. I was in two minds about neutering because in terms of his temperament he has never been aggressive to any dogs even when they've had a go at him and he loves everybody and everything but I'm starting to think that we might have to get him done at 14 months now that the urge to hump has reared its head.
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Spotalot



Joined: 12 Sep 2010
Posts: 3185
Location: Essex

PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad you are making progress with the car.
Daisy seemed to grow out of it at about a year old as well.

The humping is just another stage I'm afraid although you do need to let him know that its not acceptable as it can become a habit.

If he's really bad there is chemical castration from the vet, my friends pointer had it twice and it worked really well but I would research any side effects first if you go that route.
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